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19 Februari

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 19 Feb 2006 7:45    Onderwerp: 19 Februari Reageer met quote

February 19

1915 British navy bombards Dardanelles

On this day in 1915, British and French battleships launch a massive attack on Turkish positions at Cape Helles and Kum Kaleh at the entrance to the Dardanelles, the narrow strait separating Europe from Asia in northwestern Turkey and the only waterway linking the Mediterranean Sea to the Black Sea.

With Turkey’s entrance into World War I in November 1914 on the side of the Central Powers, the Dardanelles were controlled by Germany and its allies, thus isolating the Russian navy from the Allied naval forces and preventing cooperation between the two, as well as blocking passage of Russian wheat and British arms back and forth. An attack on the Dardanelles was thus a key objective of the Allies from the beginning of the war.

The British, and especially Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill, became convinced that it was possible to win control of the strait by a purely naval attack, avoiding the diversion of soldiers from the battlegrounds on the Western Front. At the end of January 1915, the British War Office approved a plan to bombard the Turkish positions at the Dardanelles; the initial bombardments would make way, they hoped, for British forces to move on Constantinople, knock Turkey out of the war and open a path to Russia.

Churchill set the date for the attack as February 19; on that day, a combined British and French fleet commanded by Admiral Sackville Carden opened fire with long-range guns on the outer Turkish fortresses, Cape Helles and Kum Kaleh. The bombardments made little initial impact, however, as the Turks were not caught unawares: they had long known an attack on the Dardanelles was a strong possibility and had been well fortified by their German allies.

The largely unsuccessful Allied efforts to force their way into the Dardanelles continued over the next two months, including a disastrous attempt on March 18 in which three ships were sunk and three more badly damaged by Turkish mines before the attack had even begun. Over Churchill’s protests, the naval attack was called off and a larger land invasion involving 120,000 troops was planned.

On April 25, troops from Britain, Australia and New Zealand launched a ground invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula, which bordered the northern side of the strait. The Turkish defense soon pushed the Allies back to the shore, inflicting heavy casualties. Trenches were dug, and the conflict settled into a bloody stalemate for the next eight months. Some 250,000 Allied soldiers died at Gallipoli; Turkish casualty rates were roughly the same. In December, the exhausted and frustrated Allied forces began their retreat. The last Allied soldiers left Gallipoli on January 8, 1916. As a result of the disastrous campaign, Winston Churchill resigned as first lord of the Admiralty and accepted a commission to command an infantry battalion in France.
www.historychannel.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 19 Feb 2006 7:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Die Nachrichten vom 19. Februar

1914

1915
Weitere Angriffe in der Champagne abgeschlagen
Tauroggen genommen
Eine Waffentat Tiroler Kaiserjäger
Beschießung von Belgrad
Beschießung der Dardanellen
Noch ein deutsches Luftschiff verloren
Der Austausch der Schwerverwundeten

1916
Gescheiterter englischer Angriff bei Ypern
Die britischen Schiffsverluste beim Gefecht auf der Doggerbank
Fliegerangriff der Italiener auf Laibach
Neue Gewaltakte der Entente gegen Griechenland
Mora nach anderthalbjährigem Ansturm gefallen

1917
Nebel an der Westfront
Englischer Vorstoß bei Messines gescheitert
Arensburg von einem Marineluftschiff bombardiert
Erfolgreiche Patrouillenunternehmung am Monte Zebio
Anfrage Amerikas in Wien

1918
Einmarsch in Dünaburg und Luck
Im Vormarsch von Riga bis Luck
Fliegerangriff auf Calais

www.stahlgewitter.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2010 20:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

19 February 1915

British warships began a naval bombardment of the outer forts of the Dardanelles but little damage was done to the forts.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/100-events-gallipoli-campaign/january-february-1915.html

The naval attack began on 19 February. Bad weather caused delays and the attack was abandoned after three battleships had been sunk and three others damaged. Military assistance was required, but by the time troops began to land on 25 April, the Turks had had ample time to prepare adequate fortifications and the defending armies were now six times larger than when the campaign began.

Lees alles op http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwone/battle_gallipoli.shtml

British navy bombards Dardanelles
On this day in 1915, British and French battleships launch a massive attack on Turkish positions at Cape Helles and Kum Kaleh at the entrance to the Dardanelles, the narrow strait separating Europe from Asia in northwestern Turkey and the only waterway linking the Mediterranean Sea to the Black Sea.
With Turkey’s entrance into World War I in November 1914 on the side of the Central Powers, the Dardanelles were controlled by Germany and its allies, thus isolating the Russian navy from the Allied naval forces and preventing cooperation between the two, as well as blocking passage of Russian wheat and British arms back and forth. An attack on the Dardanelles was thus a key objective of the Allies from the beginning of the war.

The British, and especially Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill, became convinced that it was possible to win control of the strait by a purely naval attack, avoiding the diversion of soldiers from the battlegrounds on the Western Front. At the end of January 1915, the British War Office approved a plan to bombard the Turkish positions at the Dardanelles; the initial bombardments would make way, they hoped, for British forces to move on Constantinople, knock Turkey out of the war and open a path to Russia.

Churchill set the date for the attack as February 19; on that day, a combined British and French fleet commanded by Admiral Sackville Carden opened fire with long-range guns on the outer Turkish fortresses, Cape Helles and Kum Kaleh. The bombardments made little initial impact, however, as the Turks were not caught unawares: they had long known an attack on the Dardanelles was a strong possibility and had been well fortified by their German allies.

The largely unsuccessful Allied efforts to force their way into the Dardanelles continued over the next two months, including a disastrous attempt on March 18 in which three ships were sunk and three more badly damaged by Turkish mines before the attack had even begun. Over Churchill’s protests, the naval attack was called off and a larger land invasion involving 120,000 troops was planned.

On April 25, troops from Britain, Australia and New Zealand launched a ground invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula, which bordered the northern side of the strait. The Turkish defense soon pushed the Allies back to the shore, inflicting heavy casualties. Trenches were dug, and the conflict settled into a bloody stalemate for the next eight months. Some 250,000 Allied soldiers died at Gallipoli; Turkish casualty rates were roughly the same. In December, the exhausted and frustrated Allied forces began their retreat. The last Allied soldiers left Gallipoli on January 8, 1916. As a result of the disastrous campaign, Winston Churchill resigned as first lord of the Admiralty and accepted a commission to command an infantry battalion in France.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history.do?action=Article&id=222
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2010 20:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sinking of the Lusitania 1915 - Winsor McCay - film 1918

Filmpje! Én inclusief dramatische pianomuziek: http://www.123video.nl/playvideos.asp?MovieID=558925

Geschiedenis
Groot-Brittannie besliste in 1902 tot de bouw van de Lusitania. Het schip moest een snelheid van 24,5 knopen kunnen behalen en geschikt zijn voor het gebruik van kanonnen. Een deel van de toekomstige bemanning zou bestaan uit reserveofficieren van de Britse marine. De Amerikaanse scheepsmagnaat John Pierpont Morgan, die Cunard Line wilde overnemen, kreeg van de Britse overheid te horen dat de Lusitania staatseigendom was, en bij een overname van het bedrijf dus niet aan hem zou toebehoren. In juli 1903 werd de bouw officieel gestart.

De reder kreeg op 19 februari 1913 opdracht de Lusitania binnen te halen en wijzigingen aan te brengen die haar meer geschikt zouden maken als hulpkruiser. Zes van haar ketels werden buiten gebruik gesteld en een deel van de stuuraccommodatie werd verwijderd om haar laadruim te vergroten. In september 1914 vernam de rederij dat de Lusitania voor het vervoer moest zorgen van 'admiraliteitsgoederen' tussen Groot-Brittanni en de Verenigde Staten, dus voor het vervoer van wapens, munitie en legergoederen.

Ondergang
Op 7 mei 1915 werd het schip tijdens een reis van New York City naar Liverpool door de Duitsers tot zinken gebracht in de Ierse Zee tijdens de duikbotenoorlog. Bijna twaalfhonderd van de opvarenden kwamen om het leven, waaronder 128 Amerikaanse staatsburgers. Een Duitse onderzeer had met een torpedo een gat geschoten tussen de derde en vierde schoorsteen van de Lusitania; kort daarop volgde nog een explosie.

Duitsland reageerde op de reacties van de Verenigde Staten en Groot-Brittannie in een nota aan de Amerikaanse regering met de vermelding op de hoogte te zijn van de vervoerde wapens en munitie en dat de torpedering dus gerechtvaardigd was, verwijzend naar haar nota aan de neutrale landen met formele aankondiging van de onderzeebootoorlog. Deze nota bracht de Amerikaanse regering in een lastig parket omdat ze nu door de Duitsers zelf verantwoordelijk werd gehouden voor de dood van de Amerikaanse burgers aan boord van het schip; Duitsland weigerde de verantwoordelijkheid op zich te nemen, maar wilde wel schadevergoedingen betalen.

Volgens het oorspronkelijke manifest bestond de lading uit 1248 kisten met elk 4 schrapnelgranaten, bestemd voor de Britse pounder-snelvuurkanonnen die gebruikt worden bij de rijdende veldartillerie. Er waren ook kisten munitie, munitie-onderdelen en explosieven aan boord voor het Brits leger.

Op 22 november 1915 weigerde Amerika de schadevergoeding van 1000 dollar voor iedere omgekomen VS-passagier en stelde de zaak uit tot na de presidentsverkiezingen van 1916.

Wrakduiken
In de jaren '60 dook de duiker John Light naar het wrak. Met zijn primitieve duikuitrusting kon hij maar een paar minuten beneden blijven en zodoende geen heldere blik op het wrak werpen. Hij sprak over een groot gat dichtbij de plek waar de torpedo insloeg en dacht dat de munitie die het schip vervoerde was ontploft toen het schip zonk.

In 1993 dook Robert Ballard naar het schip om het geval nader te onderzoeken. Hij dook naar de circa 100 meter diep liggende Lusitania en zag dat er zeer veel kolengruis op de bodem lag. Hij veronderstelde dat de torpedo één van de kolenbunkers langs weerszijden van de romp opengescheurd had en een ontploffing veroorzaakt had in het zeer explosieve kolengruis. Die ontploffing zou mogelijk weer een andere bunker hebben doen openscheuren en op die manier een kettingreactie in werking hebben gezet. Zo kon de Lusitania zinken terwijl er maar één torpedo op afgeschoten was.

In september 2008 werd definitief aangetoond dat de Lusitania munitie vervoerde toen een expeditie onder leiding van de Ierse duiker Eoin McGarry een grote hoeveelheid munitie aantrof in het wrak.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2010 20:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

E. V. Debs
The Prospect for Peace

First Published: February 19, 1916
Source: American Socialist February 19, 1916


There is no doubt that the belligerent nations of Europe are all heartily sick of war and that they would all welcome peace even if they could not dictate all its terms.

But it should not be overlooked that this frightful upheaval is but a symptom of the international readjustment which the underlying economic forces are bringing about, as well as the fundamental changes which are being wrought in our industrial and political institutions. Still, every war must end and so must this. The destruction of both life and property has been so appalling during the eighteen months that the war has been waged that we may well conclude that the fury of the conflict is largely spent and that, with bankruptcy and ruin such as the world never beheld staring them in the face, the lords of capitalist misrule are about ready to sue for peace.

From the point of view of the working class, the chief sufferers in this as in every war, the most promising indication of peace is the international conference recently held in Zimmerwald, Switzerland, attended by representatives of all European neutral nations and some of the belligerent powers. This conference, consisting wholly of representatives of the working class issued a ringing manifesto in favor of the international re-organization on a permanent and uncompromising anti-war basis and of putting forth all possible efforts to end the bloody conflict which for a year and a half has shocked Christendom and outraged the civilization of the world.

The manifesto above referred to has been received with enthusiasm by the workers of all of the belligerent nations and the sentiment in favor of its acceptance and of the program of procedure it lays down is spreading rapidly in labor circles in the nations at war as well as in those at peace.

It would no doubt do much to clear the situation and expedite peace overtures if a decisive battle were fought and the indications are that sucha battle, or series of battles, will be fought between now and spring. But the opportune moment for pressing peace negotiations can be determined only by the logic of events and when this comes the people of the United States should be ready to help in every way in their power to terminate this unholy massacre and bring peace to the world.

As to the terms upon which peace is to be restored these will no doubt be determined mainly by the status of the several belligerent powers when the war is ended. A program of disarmament looking to the prevention of another such catastrophe would seem to be suggested by the present heart-breaking situation but as experience has demonstrated that capitalist nations have no honor and that the most solemn treaty is but a “scrap of paper” in their mad rivalry for conquest and plunder, such a program, even if adopted, might prove abortive and barren of results.

The matter of the conquered provinces will no doubt figure largely in the peace negotiations and the only way to settle that in accordance with the higher principles of civilized nations is to allow the people of each province in dispute to decide for themselves by popular vote what nation they desire to be annexed to, or to remain, if they prefer, independent sovereignties.

Permanent peace, however; peace based upon social justice, will never prevail until national industrial despotism has been supplanted by international industrial democracy. The end of profit and plunder among nationas will also mean the end of war and the dawning of the era of “Peace on Earth and Good Will among Men.”

http://www.marxists.org/archive/debs/works/1916/peace.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2010 20:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

19th to 23rd FEBRUARY.

The Bn bathed and cleaned up. Training continued "on the old and never ending lines".
The Lena Ashwell concert party performed in the YMCA hut.
On the 22nd there was much snow.

http://www.communigate.co.uk/ne/4thyorksbtn/page19.phtml
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2010 21:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI.

VOL. 156. February 19, 1919.


Russian soldiers are now permitted to smoke in the streets and to travel in railway carriages. Later on it is hoped that the privilege of dying a natural death may be extended to them.

It is said that a soldier in the Lancashire Fusiliers decided, on being demobilised, to accept a standard civilian suit instead of the usual gratuity. The Sergeant-Major in charge of the case lies in a critical condition.

ISAAC DENBIGH, of Chicago, is, we are told, one-hundred-and-thirteen years of age. He must try again. We expect better things than this from America.

The German ex-Crown Prince is so determined that the Allies shall not place him on trial that he now threatens to commit suicide or die in the attempt.

The report that demobilisation will be completed by March 31st is now officially denied. There would appear to be something in the rumour that the Demobilisation Staff have expressed the hope of dying in harness.

http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/1/4/1/4/14146/14146.txt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2010 21:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

19 February 1917, Commons Sitting

PRISONERS OF WAR


HC Deb 19 February 1917 vol 90 cc981-2 981

§ 75. Mr. NOEL BUXTON asked the hon. Member for Sheffield (Central Division), whether the Dutch Minister at Berlin has received permission to inspect British prisoners' camps, both civilian and military?

§ Mr. JAMES HOPE (Lord of the Treasury) There is no reason to suppose that the permission granted to the United States Embassy at Berlin to inspect camps, which was based on the principle of reciprocity, will not automatically be extended to the Netherland Legation at Berlin.

§ Mr. BUXTON asked whether any further Reports furnished by the American Ambassador to Berlin, before his departure from Germany, on the condition of British prisoners at Ruhleben remain to be published?

§ Mr. HOPE The last Report on Ruhleben furnished by the American Ambassador was dated August, 1916. No such Reports can be published without the consent of the United States Government.

§ Mr. NIELD asked whether the enemy prisoners of war receive parcels of food from Germany or Austria; if so, what is the weekly average of such parcels and are the contents of such parcels taken into account to the relief of rations served out to such prisoners at the expense of the public funds of this country; are parcels of similar character received by interned alien enemies; and are the same rules applied to them as to prisoners of war?

§ Mr. HOPE Prisoners of war, combatant and civilian, in this country are permitted to receive parcels containing food from Germany and Austria. I regret that it is not possible, without lengthy inquiry, to state the weekly average of such parcels. It is not the practice in this country, nor, so far as I am informed, in any belligerent country, to take into account the supplies so received in calculating the ration issued to such prisoners.

§ Mr. NIELD asked when the Committee, consisting of all the Departments interested in the feeding of enemy prisoners of war and interned alien enemies, met, and when may they be expected to arrive at a decision concerning the new scale of rationing; and what is the need for prolonged consideration of the question unless the proposed new scale is to be less than that prescribed by the Food Controller for voluntary acceptance by the public in the United Kingdom?

§ Mr. HOPE The Committee in question has concluded its inquiry, and the result will be published in the course of the next few days as an Army Council Instruction. The fixing of the scale has involved elaborate calculations of supplies, prices, and calories, and has caused unavoidable discussion between the Departments concerned.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1917/feb/19/prisoners-of-war
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2010 21:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

19 February 1915

Great Britain and France accept Russia's claims to Istanbul and other Turkish lands.

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Russian_Revolution_of_1917
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2010 21:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

THE FUNDAMENTAL LAW OF LAND SOCIALIZATION
[Decree of the Central Executive Committee, February 19, 1918]

PART I. GENERAL PROVISIONS
Article 1. All private ownership of land, minerals, waters, forests, and natural resources within the boundaries of the Russian Federated Soviet Republic is abolished forever.

Article 2. Henceforth all the land is handed over without compensation (open or secret) to the toiling masses for their use.

Article 3. With the exceptions indicated in this decree the right to the use of the land belongs to him who cultivates it with his own labor.

Article 4. The right to the use of the land cannot be limited on account of sex, religion, nationality, or citizenship.

Lees verder op http://www.barnsdle.demon.co.uk/russ/land.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Direct Election of U.S. Senators

On 19 February 1914 legislation was introduced in the House of Delegates calling for the direct election of United States senators by the voters of Virginia. Though the Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution had been ratified by thirty-six of the forty-eight states by 9 April 1913, Virginia had not yet voted for or against this amendment.

Before the passage of this legislation, U.S. senators were chosen jointly by both houses of a state legislature. Direct election of senators was intensely discussed during the writing of the U.S. Constitution, as proponents of both sides voiced their convictions. Though some called for direct election by the people, the majority of convention delegates concluded that having one house chosen by the people and one by the legislature would provide an effective balance of power. However, by the mid-nineteenth century, many Americans began to call for reform. Growing ever fearful of corporate and monied interests, many believed the system of selecting U.S. senators was in need of change. These reformers argued that elections in the legislature were often burdened by lengthy delays, corruption, and a lack of consensus.

In Virginia, the changes in state government and elections brought about by the Constitution of 1902 led to the creation of a primary system that allowed voters to submit nominations for the legislature to consider for appointment. This progressive reform was a tremendous stepping-stone, as the Seventeenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution served to bring equal rights and protections to voters throughout the Union.

http://www.vahistorical.org/onthisday/21914.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Bankbiljet: Duitsland 20 Mark, 19 februari 1914





http://www.catawiki.nl/catalogus/bankbiljetten/series/reichsbanknote/159317-duitsland-20-mark?area=1d49fbc67cd858e8333cae27997b45e599db9592
Ook hier: http://numpszi.com/germannotes/Empire.shtml
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sergei Sazonov, letter to the Russian ambassador In London (19th February 1914)

The peace of the world will only be secure on the day when the Triple Entente, whose real existence is not better authenticated than the existence of the sea serpent, shall transform itself into a defensive alliance without secret clauses and publicly announced in all the world press. On that day the danger of a German hegemony will be finally removed, and each one of us will be able to devote himself quietly to his own affairs.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/RUSsazonov.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Opening van het Koninklijk Koloniaal Invalidenhuis Bronbeek (19 februari 1863)



Koning Willem III stelt zijn landgoed Bronbeek bij Velp ter beschikking aan veteranen van het Koninklijk Nederlands-Indische Leger (zie 4 december 1830). Gepensioneerde en invalide militairen van het KNIL kunnen hier hun oude dag doorbrengen en verzorging vinden. De collectie krijgskundige voorwerpen, schilderijen en boeken, die in de loop der jaren wordt verzameld, vormt de basis voor het huidige Museum Bronbeek.

http://www.defensie.nl/nimh/geschiedenis/tijdbalk/1814-1914/opening_van_het_koninklijk_koloniaal_invalidenhuis_bronbeek_(19_februari_1863)
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:15    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Thursday, February 19, 1914: L’Acadien (Paris)



http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2008/12/05/the-paper-of-record/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hove's new motorised fire brigade, on 19th February 1914



http://www.mybrightonandhove.org.uk/page_id__5845_path__0p1364p1013p1395p214p221p.aspx
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Utrechts Nieuwsblad (19-02-1915)

http://www.hetutrechtsarchief.nl/collectie/kranten/un/1915/0219
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Frank JAMES died 18 February 1915 - Kearney, MO
"The Kansas City Times" (Missouri) Friday, February 19, 1915

WHEN FRANK JAMES GAVE UP.

The JAMES boys robbed from the Mississippi to the Rio Grande, and no one could catch them.

But in the late seventies the lines were tightening about them all the time. The country was filling up. It became more difficult to escape, to hide. Big rewards offered by states and corporations bred treachery in their camps.

It was this that brought the death of Jesse JAMES, shot down from behind by the FORD boys, in his own home in St. Joseph, in sight of his wife and two children, for a reward of $50,000 offered by the state of Missouri. So many robberies within the state by a band of her own, had made Missouri infamous. It injured business. Travelers were afraid to pass this way. Hence the big reward; the treachery, the death of Jesse JAMES.

Frank JAMES told the writer of this that long before the death of his brother, Jesse, he, Frank, had given up out-lawry, foreseeing the end that was sure to be, and that then he was living peacefully in a Southern state, with his wife and family, under an assumed name.

Frank denied that he was at the robbery of the train at Winston, Mo., one night in July, 1879, when the conductor, William WESTFALL, and John McMILLEN were killed by the bandits.

But Frank was under suspicion of having been there and a grand jury had named him in an indictment for the murder. He was a fugitive from justice.

The system of train robbery invented by him was yet being practiced and for each one Frank was blamed. He decided to surrender and take his chances.

T. T. CRITTENDEN was governor of Missouri. October 6, 1882, Frank JAMES, accompanied by a few faithful friends, went to the office of the governor in Jefferson City. What occurred is described as follows in Leonard’s History of Missouri:

- - - - - - - - - -

Maj. John N. EDWARDS advanced to the governor, shook hands with him and in an easy, matter-of –fact way introduced “My friend, Mr. Frank JAMES.” They took one another by the hand, the chief magistrate and the brigand, and then the unlooked-for visitor unbuttoned his coat and, unbuckling his belt, handed it, with the pistol in it, to the governor as a token of surrender and delivery.

“Governor CRITTENDEN,” he said, as he proffered the butt of the revolver --- a 44 caliber Remington --- which had been presented, muzzle foremost, on many a critical occasion, and made to do its part in many a fierce combat, “I want to hand over to you that which no man living, except myself, has ever been permitted to touch since 1861, and to say that I am your prisoner. I have taken all the cartridges out of the weapon and you can handle it with safety.”

Governor CRITTENDEN took the revolver by its butt and, turning to the company in the room, who had not understood what was going on, said: “Gentlemen, this is Frank JAMES, and I take pleasure in introducing him to you.”

There was a look of surprise at the announcement, and then the party came forward and, one by one, shook hands with the outlaw.

“I came to Missouri last week,” he said, addressing the party. “I have come in the hope that you, gentlemen, will let me prove that I am not nearly so bad a man as I have been represented. I have come back to Missouri to try and regain a home and standing among her people. I have been outside her laws for twenty-one years. I have been hunted like a wild animal from one state to another. I have known no home. I have slept in all sorts of places; here today, there tomorrow. I have been charged with nearly every crime committed either in Missouri or her neighboring states. I have been taught to suspect my dearest and nearest friend of treachery, and where’s the end to be?

“I am tired of this life of night riding and day hiding; of constant listening for footfalls, cracking twigs, rustling leaves and creaking doors; tired of the saddle, the revolver and the cartridge belt. The one desire of my life is to regain the citizenship which I lost in the dark days, when, in Western Missouri, every man’s hand was against his neighbor, and to prove that I am not unworthy of it by submitting to the most rigid tests that the law may require.”

- - - - - - - - - -

Frank was taken to Independence, lodged in jail and in due time tried for the murder of WESTFALL, the train conductor, in the court in Gallatin, Mo., and acquitted.

It was a famous trial. John F. PHILIPS, afterward United States judge, now a practicing lawyer in this city, defended JAMES. William WALLACE, now a lawyer in this city and widely known as prohibition candidate for governor in several elections, prosecuted JAMES.

http://boards.ancestry.com/topics.crime.jesse-james/162.3/mb.ashx
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:28    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Korps Pontonniers Dordrecht, Pontonbrug op 19 februari 1916. Overtocht munitietreinen.



Deze foto is vanaf de Oude Maas of vanaf de Zwijndrechtse walkant genomen. Op de achtergrond is uiterst rechts de Pontonnierskazerne op de Buiten Walevest zichtbbaar en uiterst links het gebouw van Sociëteit "De Harmonie". In het laatst genoemde gebouw heeft naderhand tot omstreeks 1969 de Gemeentelijke Kweekschool haar hoofdvestiging gehad.

http://sa-dordrecht.cust.iaf.nl/index.cfm?fuseaction=search.showdetail&id=829E5400DB5BF507E334560AE6BCEEE4&showbrowse
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:32    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Yorkshire Trench & Dug-Out

On 19 February 1916 the trench near post F34 was captured by the Germans and posts F33 to F30 east of it had to be evacuated. And so a new British first line had to be established on the next day, about 100 yards behind the evacuated line. However, it was found so much shell pitted as to be impracticable. So it was decided that a line about 250 yards from the evacuated posts was to be wired. As a result of that the no man's land was widened : now it was between 200 and 500 metres wide. And after that strategic withdrawal of the first line, a position was reached that corresponds with what later was to be named 'Yorkshire Trench'.

http://www.mausershooters.org/diggers/E/activiteiten/yorkshire-trench/restauratie.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Otto Liman von Sanders



Liman von Sanders became the commander of the Turkish 1st Army. In March 1915 he was replaced by Baron von der Goltz and sent to the Dardanelles (near Canakkale) with the 5th Army. He and Mustafa Kemal acquired a great victory with the Allied defeat at Gallipoli. After Gallipoli, Liman von Sanders returned to Istanbul on 19 February 1916 as chief of the military mission to Turkey.

http://www.allaboutturkey.com/sanders.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 20:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

New York Times, February 19, 1917



One of the first advertisements for Bayer Aspirin aimed at American consumers, just before the U.S. patent for aspirin was to expire.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bayer_Aspirin_ad,_NYT,_February_19,_1917.jpg
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letter from 2683 William Albert Wenham to his mother, 19th February 1917





Transcript:

"No: 2683
Name: Lc. Cpl. Wenham
5th Batt: Lincs Regt:
Comp: British Company
Camp of prisoners of war
No: I
Cottbus
Germany

Mrs. Wenham
49 Barcroft St
New Cleethorpes
Grimsby
Lincs
England

Feb 19th

Dear Mother. Just a line hoping you are all well, as it leaves me nearly better I am pleased to say. I am anxious waiting to hear from you to know how you are getting along. I also hope Tom is alright yet, you must let me know as soon as possible. Well Dear Mother you must take care of yourself. Will you please notify my regiment as to the change of address. Give my love to Maria & Tom and the children xxx. Remember me to all. From Your Ever Loving Son, Billy. xxxxxx"

http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/gwa/document/8731/2451
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

‘U155’ at Tower Bridge



During her career she carried out three patrols between 19 February 1917 and 11 November 1918, during which she sank 66 Allied merchant ships with a combined tonnage of 188,101 tons.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalmaritimemuseum/2842843325/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Macmillan, Angus, Letter, 19 February 1917



No. 2 Red Cross Hospital Rouen 19th Feb. 1917
Dear Clive, Don't think that because I haven't written for so long that I have just been slack and not taken the trouble. It isn't that at all. But after I heard from mother about Gerald, and had written to you immediately afterwards, in my opinion it was better no to write for sometime, firstly because it would take time for any fresh news to get through, and secondly because you and your mother would only be bothered by letters which could only contain news of my own doings, which I should hate to thrust upon you at such a time. Now that some time has elapsed, you may perhaps be able to tell me if you have had any more news of Gerald, although I fear he had only a small chance of safety. Mother wrote and said you were maknig inquiries through the American agency for prisoners of war. At any rate I would like to hear all you have heard yourself. Also what has been happening to you in the meantime. I should say that in view of the circumstances the local tirbunal should have exempted you straight off. WIll you let me know all about yourself? Your mother must have had a terrible time. I hope she is managing to keep pretty well.
Another reason why I did not write was that I hoped for leave. I have had none, and don't see much chance of ever getting it unless I get sick leave after being discharged from hospital. There is very little chance of getting home, I think, with my complaint, which is principally skin trouble, brought on by the dirty conditions up the line. It is taking a long time to curb. It is a blessing that that awful cold weather is over. Thirty three degrees of [pist?] in the trenches is no joke. I hope you are keeping fit. Give my live to your mother. Your affec. friend, Angus

http://digitalcollections.mcmaster.ca/macmillan-angus-letter-19-february-1917-0
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant, 19 februari 1918
Bron: Koninklijke Bibliotheek

Uit Armenië

KONSTANTINOPEL, 17 Februari. (Milli.) Uit het oorlogsperskwartier wordt gemeld: een afdeeling der benden, die langs den straatweg Erzindjan-Mamkatoem de vlucht namen, werd door onze detachementen verrast op het oogenblik dat zij bezig was wreedheden in de naburige dorpen te bedrijven. De bende antwoordde met haar kannonnen en machinegeweren. Na afloop van het gevecht had zij 200 dooden; de rest vluchtte in wanorde. Drie kanonnen, twee bomwerpers, een machinegeweer en acht wagens met oorlogsmaterieel vielen in onze handen. Onder de dooden bevonden zich twee hoofden der benden.

(Het rapport eindigt met een relaas van wreedheden, die de Armeniërs op de Musulmannen zouden hebben bedreven. Op den weg van Tsjardakli naar Erzindjan staat geen dorp meer overeind, terwijl de bewoners allen zijn vermoord. – Red.)

http://www.agindepers.nl/kwestie/NRC-19-2-1918.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De Belgische Standaard tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog: Poelcapelle 14-18 in de krant - 19 februari 1918



http://poelkapelle.wimme.net/node/1296
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Miles Day

Flight Commander Miles Jeffrey Game Day was a World War I flying ace credited with five aerial victories.

Day was already an experienced test pilot when he joined 13 Squadron RNAS on 19 December 1917. He scored five victories while flying a Sopwith Camel. His first win came on 3 January 1918, and his final one on 19 February 1918. Eight days later, he was shot down in flames into the sea 25 miles west of Dunkirk, downed by a German seaplane.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_Day
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Palestine - Jericho

The battle for Jericho began on 19 February 1918. The town was taken the following day by the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade. It was found to be full of dead or dying Turks suffering from typhus.

http://www.army.mil.nz/culture-and-history/nz-army-history/historical-chronology/1902.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Soldier's Mail - Letters Home from a New England Doughboy 1916-1919

Somewhere near Vaudesson, 2/19/1918

Same dug out.

Dear Em.

Having got possesion of a little ink, a stub of a candle and some writing paper (the Lord only knows where the envelope is coming from) I write. I received your very welcome letter of Jan. 20-18, also one from Sadie, the letters you wrote Sunday when Babe was playing the piano, the victrola was going and Pa was enjoying it all. Say Em, you talk about old people finding consolation in reading the Bible. Here is an old man and your letters has it on anything for consolation I tell you.

I suppose by this time you have got the letter I sent stating that we are away up here in the front line holding a section of the line of trenches with the French. Yes Em America is in it now and forever if Germany chooses to look at it that way. This trench life is all that it has been cracked up to be and we havent seen much wet weather latly either. The sector that we are on you have no doubt read of very often I know I have. Two of the boys have already been knoked off and more wounded. (Don’t tell any of the draft boys this) We hear that “Boston’s Own” are in France now and are going to occuppy the town we left before our move up here. If this is true they will go into a nice little town beleive me. We never expect to see this dear little village again for it is too far away from the front to move us to. We expect to stay here about twenty more days before being pulled out for a rest, and then in again for another period.

Ive been very buisy all day writing on Co. work and say Em you talk about coal-less days. My fingers are feel-less and if you liken my feet unto yours when yours are cold you’ll have it. Yes we have quite a lot of paper work in the trenches, while the big shells, machine guns awhirl over head and the air ships buzz, fight, and observe. First you here a whistle that sounds louder and louder, then a bang. Air fights are an hourly occurance, and say the boys are cleaver that drive these machines. Talk about your Beechy stunts, he is dead. The thrill of this, and the big Jack Johnson have all worn off now.

By the way Em Im fine and have been ever since my first real sleep which was Sunday night. Do you remember those two pairs of big heavy socks I bought away back when I was called out. Well Em they are the most sensible thing I ever bought in my life. My feet are cold understand but I can imagine what they would be with the issue sock. This little candle is burning very fast and it is a race as to who will finish first the light or me. Living in the ground no fires and very few candles. This is the life, this is the life, (it has come to be the life for me). Im far from liking it, but its the best weve got.

Im going to try to send Madge a line, but she is all I guess outside of you folks at home there. Its funny to here you mention the picture and having a few more left I thought Id send them along, before I loose them. Some lose what? Id like to put these fingers down your neck now, I bet you’d go over the top to get at me. Well Em such is life up to the present and here is hoping that the future is as good as the past has been. We are in for some tough times but Ill pull through all right as I always have. Im in the best of health which is half the game to start with.

Does Lena bite her finger nails now. Tell her I havent got any. Hoping this finds you all very comfortable (I can appreciate it) I think Ill close for the present. It is neadless for me to mention them all by name but I think of every one back there and I want you to remmember me to them. Yours truly.

1st Sgt. Samuel E. Avery Hdq. Co. 103rd Inf. 26 Div. A.E.F.

Now for an envelope.

http://worldwar1letters.wordpress.com/2009/02/19/somewhere-near-vaudesson-2191918/
Zie ook http://worldwar1letters.wordpress.com/the-adventure-unfolds/over-there-1918-1919/chemin-des-dames-feb-march-1918/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Het Pan-Afrikaans Congres van 1919

Het Pan-Afrikaans Congres dat op 19, 20 en 21 februari 1919 in Parijs werd gehouden, was het tweede moment in de geschiedenis dat een deel van de zwarte wereldbevolking zich verenigd liet horen en hoewel gematigd, om meer zelfbeschikking en zelfbestuur vroeg. Het begrip panafrikanisme, dat voor het eerst op de Pan-Afrikaanse Conferentie van 1900 in Londen werd gebruikt, kreeg na het congres in 1919 pas echt gehoor. De Amerikaanse intellectueel, professor en redacteur W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963) was verantwoordelijk voor de organisatie en bleek een onmisbare factor te zijn voor het slagen van het congres. Naast meer rechten verklaarde de 57 afgevaardigden ook dat er een pakket aan internationale wetten nodig was om de inheemse bevolking van Afrika te beschermen tegen uitbuiting, lijfstraffen en slavernij en hen van goed onderwijs te voorzien. Een ander doel was het onder internationale supervisie plaatsen van de voormalige Duitse koloniën Tanzania, Kameroen, Togo en Zuidwest Afrika welke het na de Eerste Wereldoorlog was kwijtgeraakt. Ondanks het feit dat een groot deel van Afrika niet op het congres werd vertegenwoordigd en de directe gevolgen van het congres minimaal waren, heeft het een belangrijke rol gespeeld bij de evolutie van de pan-Afrikaanse stroming. Na het congres in Parijs zijn er nog vier andere Pan-Afrikaanse Congressen in 1921, 1923, 1927 en 1945 gehouden.

Lees verder op http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Het_Pan-Afrikaans_Congres_van_1919
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Leo "Buth" De Budt overleden (1919-2010)

De Gentse striptekenaar Leo De Budt, beter bekend als Buth, is vanochtend overleden. (...)

Leo De Budt werkte onder het pseudoniem Buth jarenlang aan de stripreeks Thomas Pips.

Doordat zijn ouders tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog uit België waren weggevlucht, werd Buth geboren in Den Haag op 19 februari 1919.

http://andreas-martens.skynetblogs.be/archive/2010/10/25/thomas-pips-vader-leo-buth-de-budt-overleden.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2011 21:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

GIVING HIM ROPE?



GERMAN CRIMINAL (to Allied Police). "HERE, I SAY, STOP! YOU'RE HURTING ME! [Aside] IF I ONLY WHINE ENOUGH I MAY BE ABLE TO WRIGGLE OUT OF THIS YET."

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14146/14146-h/14146-h.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 19 Feb 2011 15:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Edward Brittain, letter to Vera Brittain (19th February, 1917)

I had a medical board on February 7th and was very surprised to get another month's home service; the same afternoon I got orders to take a draft of 70 men to France and left at 7.30 pm. We stopped at several places to pick up other drafts and arrived at Folkestone without changing at 7 am. on Thursday the 8th. The men were put in the rest camp - 59 of the best houses on the front have been commandeered for this purpose - and I went to the Burlington for a bath and breakfast...

We crossed about 3 pm. that afternoon closely escorted by destroyers and went to the rest camp at Boulogne that night; it was awfully cold because it was one of the coldest nights of this winter and the camp is right on top of the hill behind the town. We left there the next afternoon and crawled by train to Calais where after a 4 mile march in the snow I handed them over at the Base Depot.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWbrittainE.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 19 Feb 2018 8:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Spectator, 19 FEBRUARY 1916, Page 1

"Though we find no special significance in the German attacks of the past week on the Western front, it must not be supposed that we are not fully aware that the Germans mean business in the West. In our opinion, they are preparing for the greatest effort they have yet made, an effort which, in their view, wilt far outweigh any of their former attempts to break through. Further, this attempt, which we believe has been carefully prepared for, especially as regards men, guns, and other munitions, including of course gas, and perhaps some new device which will probably prove as fantastic as usual at the first surprise, and as negligible afterwards, is likely to come very soon. This opinion is not only backed up by competent first-hand observers of what is going on in Germany, but is strongly supported by the login of events. The Germans are nothing if not scientific and statistical in their methods. They are always estimating their own strength and comparing it with that of the Allies. Indeed, optimists as they are, they realize that their fetish of Will-Power cannot be fed by faint hearts, and they feel very strongly that "the will to power'' must be stuffed " with the certainty of victory.""

http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/19th-february-1916/1/though-we-find-no-special-significance-in-the-germ via http://archive.spectator.co.uk/page/19th-february-1916/1
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BerichtGeplaatst: 19 Feb 2018 8:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Notes on the Front - A Great Adventure - 19 February 1916 - Author: James Connolly

We wonder how many men have been led into the British Army by the lust for adventure. It seems to us that they must form no very inconsiderable proportion of the whole.

It is natural that the young should thirst for adventure; we would not think very highly of a boy who did not lustafter excitement, or be eager to do deeds the smug respectable property-respecting world would deem unlawful.
If he was our boy we might possibly spank him for doing such things, but even whilst the spanking process was in full swing we would be secretly proud that the boy — our boy — had enough of the adventurous spirit in him to override conventional restraints.

It is the spirit of adventure that has carried the world upward from savagery and ignorance into civilisation and knowledge. It is the spirit of adventure that discovered new continents, opened up ways over trackless waters, mapped and charted snow-covered mountains and pathless forests, and linked together territories and peoples seemingly destined by nature to be isolated and alien.

It is the spirit of adventure that drove men to harness the elements to the service of mankind, to utilise steam and electricity, and all the wonderful secrets of nature that the powers of man may be strengthened by the natural forces of the world.

Beneficent has been the spirit of adventure in man, and destructive also.

It is the spirit of adventure in man that enabled the tyrants of the world in all ages to secure the services of the stronger and healthier and least thoughtful of the race to be armed bullies over and slayers of their more peaceful or more freedom-loving fellows.

Given a state of hard and soulless bondage to labour, a round of grinding, miserably-paid toil, with no outlook save in the direction of more labour, and more toil as miserably paid, and who can wonder if the spirit revolts at times, and sets the feet of the labourer straying on the path of adventure that the life of a soldier in war time seems to open.

How often do we meet in life the tale of a labourer who has served an employer, or a public board for 20, 30, or 40 years, and found at last that his faithful service had earned him no security in his old age. Must not the thought sometimes come to the younger generation who read such a story that it would be better for them to 'break loose' occasionally, rather than be such perfect machines for others to exploit, and then throw in the rubbish heap.

Or even when peace in old age, and comfort, awaits these patient plodders in industrial harness can high-spirited people help speculating upon the question whether that life is reallyworth living. Thirty years, forty years, in one job! Think of it. For thirty, forty years, to have no variety, see no new faces, break no new territory, adventure into no undiscovered grounds. For thirty, forty years, to be able to forecast a year ahead just what you would do on such and such a date. That you will get out of bed at such an hour, breakfast at such an hour, cease work at a definite moment, and so on from day to day, month to month, year to year, without a change until all the sap and vigour of life had gone out of you. And all in the hope that when you were grown too old to be useful you might be fed and sheltered, like a favourite dog, until you died.
‘When we reach to a certain age,’ says a French cynic, ‘we think we have abandoned our vices, when in reality it is our vices that have abandoned us.’

The patient industrial plodder is a man who plods away in harness in the hope that he will have a good time when he is old, only to discover that when he is old he becomes incapable of enjoying a good time.

What wonder then that the tacit rebellion against such a fearful, drab existence — that rebellion which no man can permanently silence in his bosom — what wonder that sometimes that rebellion surges up triumphantly, and carries off the plodding slave into the adventurous path.

Ordinarily the means of escape into the alluring paths of adventure are awanting, and the slave plods on, and before the opportunity comes the adventurous surge within him has subsided. But the beating of the drums of war, the insistent call of the bugles to battle, continued for weeks and months, and aided by all the resources of a powerful and astute government anxious to dominate the imagination of its subjects, provides eventually for all such men the opportunity for escape and keeps it open long enough to catch the fancy at the proper moment.

The spirit of adventure then must be reckoned with among the many factors that help to drive men into the profession of hired assassins – as soldiering for pay has been well and fitly termed.

But it also must be counted amongst the forces that make for revolutions. The revolutionists of the past have ever been adventurous spirits, else they would never have been revolutionists. ‘I perceive,’ said Wolfe Tone in his Diary, ‘that merchants make bad revolutionists.’ And, as usual, Tone wasright. The spirit of calculation which is the very essence of the spirit of a good merchant is the destruction of a good revolutionist.
For no matter how carefully you plan, how wisely you arrange your course of action, how astutely you have everything thought out, how admirably every contingency is provided against, there is always for the revolutionist the knowledge that a sudden move of the enemy may set all your schemes at naught, and force action along lines never even dreamed of by your wisest heads. In such a contingency the swiftest thought must be instantly followed by the swiftest action – the spirit of adventure then becomes the greatest revolutionary asset.

And just as the spirit of adventure sent hundreds, perhaps thousands, into the British Army, so it would send its thousands, and its tens of thousands, into the revolutionary ranks. Indeed it is safe to say that there are hundreds and perhaps thousands of young Irishmen serving in the British Army to-day, in obedience to the spirit of adventure, who would have served far more gladly in the revolutionary army of Ireland, had they been convinced that such an army was even a possibility of the near future.

Hard it will be in the future to apportion rightly the responsibility, the guilt, of allowing that splendid spirit of adventure in young Irish hearts to be perverted to the purposes of the foreign ruler, instead of being wisely handled for the Cause of Freedom.

The Irish Race is an old race – perhaps the oldest in Europe. But in its individual members the Irish Race is ever young. Amongst no other people do the old so readily sympathise with and share in the hopes, the joys, and the spirit of the young. The Irish Race rises responsive to the call of battle; the beat of the drums seems to set its blood tingling through its veins to feel its feet once more set upon adventurous paths. A thousand times defeated the Irish Race once more pants to challenge its destiny.

And this is the spirit in which we hear the Call to the Great Adventure of our generation.

https://celt.ucc.ie/published/E900002-062/text001.html
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
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BerichtGeplaatst: 19 Feb 2018 8:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letter from James Finn to May Fay, 19 February 1916

http://letters1916.maynoothuniversity.ie/diyhistory/items/show/647
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BerichtGeplaatst: 19 Feb 2018 8:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The news 100 years ago: 19th - 26th February 1916

Each week on the School website we publish the names and short biographies of the Old Salopians killed 100 years ago during the First World War, together with brief details of the progress of the War. This is part of a four-year project in collaboration with St Chad's Church, Shrewsbury, which was begun in August 2014.

This week we remember:

Captain John Arthur Walker, 10th Bn. Royal Welsh Fusiliers
Moser’s, ‘a quiet, unobtrusive boy’, left in 1909 for Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and at the outbreak of war at once joined the O.T.C; he was gazetted November 1914 and promoted Captain July 1915.

His Commanding Officer said “He was beloved by both officers and men. His was one of those rare natures that one could not help loving”. His Chaplain also wrote, “As a friend his loss is inestimable and as a soldier he was a born leader of men, the memory of whom should ever be a source of inspiration to all who knew him”.

Killed in action by the explosion of a shell while encouraging his men in Belgium, 19th February 1916, aged 24.

Buried at Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Belgium. Grave I. B. 8.

https://www.shrewsbury.org.uk/node/54473
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BerichtGeplaatst: 19 Feb 2018 9:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HANSARD → 19 February 1917 → Written Answers (Commons) → MILITARY SERVICE.

SOLDIER UNDER AGE.

Mr. LYNCH asked the Under-Secretary of State for War whether he is aware that Michael Francis Leahy, son of Mrs. Bridget Leahy, Kilkee, is now serving as a soldier in the 5th Royal Munster Fusiliers, and that Michael Leahy's mother has forwarded to the authorities a birth certificate showing that he was born on 30th May, 1901, and that consequently he is not sixteen years of age; and will he say whether, in spite of the requests of his mother, it is intended to keep this boy in the Army?

Mr. MACPHERSON Inquiries are being made, and my hon. Friend will be informed of the result in due course.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/1917/feb/19/soldier-under-age via http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/sittings/1917/feb/19
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2018 10:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Qui a volé le cercueil de Pétain?

Au petit matin du 19 février 1973, lorsque le gardien du cimetière de Port-Joinville de l'île d'Yeu entame sa ronde matinale, il ne se doute pas encore de ce qu'il va découvrir... A 9h00, l'employé municipal remarque que la pierre tombale du maréchal Pétain est anormalement propre et que les joints ont été fraîchement refaits. Il alerte la gendarmerie toute proche. Quelques heures plus tard en présence du préfet, les gendarmes constatent que le cercueil a été volé ! C'est le début d'une affaire d'état.

Lees verder:
http://www.ina.fr/contenus-editoriaux/articles-editoriaux/qui-a-vole-le-cercueil-de-petain/

https://www.facebook.com/128685980501378/photos/a.156523277717648.23965.128685980501378/1586409368062358/?type=3&theater
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